The best organic farming always is when you know how to use nature as it is.

As our knowledge of the harmful effects of agricultural chemicals grows, more and more farmers and consumers are rediscovering their organic history, returning to the methods of old, such as plucking insect pests and weeds by hand and hoe, and amending soil with natural fertilizers—compost. The joy in growing your own food is the joy in savoring its delicious flavor and in providing good food for others to enjoy. Discover how to rebuild your garden with an organic foundation and produce the vegetables, fruits and herbs that will nourish your family and the families of those who purchase your produce.
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How to remove pesticides from fruits and vegetables?

Many people are going organic these days, but it can be hard to afford an all-organic lifestyle when it comes to buying fruits and vegetables. Additionally, the organic selection at traditional grocery stores can be limited, especially at certain times of the year, so you are forced to buy non-organic produce. Either way, it is helpful to be able to remove some of the pesticides that coat the outsides of non-organic produce! Questions have been raised about the safety of imported fruit and vegetables, with suggestions they're more likely than locally-grown produce to be contaminated with toxic pesticides.

 Pesticide in Fruits

The importance of washing produce before eating or cooking it was driven home today by the release of a list of fruits and vegetables that tested positive for the highest concentration of pesticides. Apples, a staple in many refrigerators, topped the list with 98 percent testing positive for a pesticide and 92 percent testing positive for two or more pesticides. Coming in second was celery, with more than 95 percent testing positive for at least one pesticide. Others on the list of shame include: strawberries, peaches, spinach, nectarines, grapes, sweet bell peppers, potatoes, blueberries, lettuce and kale or collard greens.

Therefore wash all your fruits and vegetables. Washing them with 2% of salt water will remove most of the contact pesticide residues that normally appear on the surface of the vegetables and fruits. Almost 75 to 80 percent of pesticide residues are removed by cold water washing. Also, be more thorough with these fruits and vegetables in specific: grapes, apples, guava, plums, mangoes, peaches and pears and vegetables like tomatoes, brinjal and okra as they might carry more residue in their crevices.

 Pesticide in Vegetables

Alternatively, you can simply wash your fresh produce in distilled white vinegar and water solution. Suggest soaking your veggies and fruits in a solution of 10% vinegar to 90% water. Make the mixture, and let the produce sit in for 15 to 20 minutes. When you remove them, you’ll notice that the water left in the bowl is dirty and may contain some gunk. Rinse fruits and vegetables in fresh water, and then enjoy your cleaner product. This method shouldn’t be used on fragile fruits, such as berries, as they have a very porous skin and might get damaged and soak in too much of the vinegar. With other fruits, there should be no lingering vinegar aroma. If you wish, you can also use lemon juice.

Try this DIY produce Spray

This pesticide-removing natural spray is super simple to make with ingredients you probably already have in your kitchen!

1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons baking soda
1 cup water

Mix these ingredients until the baking soda has dissolved, and pour into a clean spray bottle. Spritz the mixture onto your fruits and vegetables, and let sit for 5-10 minutes. Rinse the mixture off, and enjoy your produce!

 Pesticide remover spray

A lot of the data comes from studies of farmworkers, who work with these chemicals regularly. Studies have linked long-term pesticide exposure in this group to increased risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease; prostate, ovarian, and other cancers; depression; and respiratory problems. There’s some suggestion that adults and children living in farm communities could also be at risk for chronic health problems. The rest of us may not handle the stuff, but we are exposed through food, water, and air. The fact that pesticide residues are generally below EPA tolerance limits is sometimes used as “proof” that the health risks are minimal. But the research used to set these tolerances is limited.









Pacu Jaya

Pacu Jaya

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